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NHL hockey dads: Parenting lessons from the ice

Haley Overland | posted Thursday, Oct 9th, 2014

Wayne Gretzky

“I always tell my kids, ‘You know what? The biggest thing you can have in life is passion,’” he has said. “If you have a passion for going to school and becoming a doctor or if you have a passion for being a good hockey player, or a good baseball player. What happens with passion is that you take that extra step, you put in that extra work, you put in the extra time because you have a dedication and a love for it. People come up to me and say, ‘Could you tell my son how many hours you used to practise?’ I say, ‘No, I can’t tell them because I didn’t think I was practising.'”

Read on for more great parenting quotes from hockey greats>>>>>

Rogers’ GamePlus puts hockey fans on ice during NHL games

BT Toronto | posted Tuesday, Oct 7th, 2014

Imagine having the capability to replay key moments of NHL games at your fingertips, or being able to get exclusive camera angles of a game.

Rogers Communications Inc. announced Monday the launch of GamePlus, part of Rogers NHL GameCentre LIVE, which will let mobile users watch a hockey game in a revolutionary way.

GamePlus features various camera feeds and multiple-angle replays, allowing fans to feel like they are on the ice, in the centre of the action. It will also include exclusive video of interviews, analysis, and original video-on-demand content.

The mobile service’s “second-screen hockey experience” provides users to watch the game live on television while they engage the unique camera angles and other features on their mobile devices.

“GamePlus is a game changer. It combines the latest in broadcast technology together with mobile app technology and we’ve invested more than $10 million to create this outstanding experience,” Keith Pelley, president of Rogers Media said in a release.

Fans will have access to different camera angles that they can use in various ways at games. They include:

  • Follow the puck from one end to another at six metres per second via a Sky Cam, which sits at the 200 level in the Air Canada Centre
  • Referee’s helmet features a Ref Cam that lets fans see the face-offs, breakaways and goals
  • Goal Line Cam gives a overhead view of the ice, right above the offensive rush
  • Get an inside view of the players’ benches, and catch the action from inside the blue line, which is what separates one team’s defensive end from the another
  • Follow any player during the game via a Star Cam

NHL Hall of Famer Mark Messier, who is Rogers’ NHL Ambassador, said the “view from the ref’s helmet makes me feel like I’m back on the ice.”

“The new camera angles really bring you inside the game, and give you a feel for the speed and intensity the players experience. Each camera gives the fan a different and unique perspective,” he said in the release.

One of the star features of GamePlus, with its multiple camera angle capability, allows fans to act like a referee and decipher tough calls, and also get different views of goals, power plays, and penalty kills.

“It puts customers in control and gives them access to angles they’ve never had before on any screen. Fans who disagree with a ref’s call can now see the game exactly as the ref sees it. They can also watch multiple replay angles of the main plays in the game,” Pelley said.

Pelley said a crew tested Game Plus last week. They were able to “create up to eight camera replay angles of major plays and have them available on mobiles and tablets in less than three minutes after the action happened.”

The service will be available on select NHL games each week, as well as the Stanley Cup playoffs, NHL All Star Game, and the 2015 Bridgestone NHL Winter Classic.

Customers who subscribe to Rogers NHL GameCentre LIVE will be able to access GamePlus on their mobile devices and tablets. Rogers NHL GameCentre LIVE is already available for download on Google Play and the App Store.

The beta version will launch on Oct. 8, in time for the NHL season opener and the puck drop between the Toronto Maple Leafs and Montreal Canadiens.

Rogers GameCentre LIVE

Rogers GameCentre LIVE will live-stream more than 1,000 NHL games throughout the 2014-2015 hockey season, live including all playoff games. It can be accessed through a new mobile app as well as NHL.com, and is also available on desktops, smartphones and tablets.

Rogers wireless data and Hi-Speed Internet customers will get a free subscription until Dec. 31, 2014. For non-Rogers customers, NHL GameCentre LIVE will cost $199.99 for the full season. A French-only package that includes les Canadiens (60 games) and les Sénateurs (54 games) regional games for $59.99 will also be available.

Click here for more information on Rogers GameCentre LIVE

Rogers is the parent company of this station and website.

When did school lunches become a political statement?

Jennifer Pinarski | posted Friday, Oct 3rd, 2014

“Why can’t I have a juice box or cookies in my lunch like all the other kids?” my daughter, Gillian, whined.

Since starting full-day kindergarten this month, Gillian has eaten everything I’ve packed in her lunch—but it hasn’t been without complaints. Typically, her comments are related to what’s missingfrom her lunch—i.e. sweet treats and packaged snacks.

My son, Isaac, now in the third grade, is used to my no-nonsense, nutrient-dense lunches and rarely complains anymore. On that particular day, he backed me up on the lunch debate, albeit with a surprising rebuttal. ”You can’t have a juice box because they’re bad for your brain, because it’s just sugar and water. Mr. L. said so,” Isaac said, a little too haughtily for my liking.

Read more: Fear mongering and the anti-sugar obsession>

“Wait a minute…sugar isn’t bad for your brain,” I responded. “Your brain and your body need sugar to work. My problem with juice boxes is that I know you’ll drink them all and not have room for food.”  I try to hide the my frustration at the fact that the school is trying to teach my kids (inaccurate) nutrition lessons.

Forget stroller wars…lunches are the new battleground. And it makes me wonder if packing a child’s lunch for school was this difficult before the days of Pinterest?

Reminiscing recently with a friend, we realized we ate the same brown-bagged lunch growing up—a frozen juice box, a mac and cheese loaf (or PB&J) on white bread, a Wagon Wheel and a red apple. Invariably, the juice box thawed and tore the paper bag, the sandwich was crushed and soggy and the apple bruised and inedible. The only item in our lunches that survived was the Wagon Wheel.

Read more: Bento box lunch ideas your kids will love>

There were no bento boxes in my day: Lunches from my childhood were utilitarian and definitely not Instagram-worthy. I remember hating school lunches, but I also remember not having a choice in what was in them since our family lived on a very limited budget. It’s clear to me that there’s been a major shift in the last 30 years as to how we feed our kids, and while awareness of the benefits of healthier and less processed food is positive, the shaming and the guilt parents seem to pile on themselves for packing a less-than-perfect lunch isn’t healthy at all.

For example:

  • The Lunchbox Dad recently declared that he was going to stop making fun lunches for his kids, because he was fed up with people making fun of him for making his kids’ lunches so fun.
  • Peanut butter has been long banned by schools (and justifiably so). But when schools started bringing in rules banning nut-free spreads, parents of picky eaters were outraged. Schools defended the decision by saying that nut-free products look too much like real peanut butter, which stresses out children who have life-threatening allergies.
  • Taking lunch policies one step further, some schools dictate what parents can and cannot pack in their kids’ lunches. Banning treats or processed snacks put teachers in the role of nutritional authorities—something I strongly disagree with.
  • Litterless lunches are a great idea—if your child remembers to rinse out their containers and close the lids. A friend of mine showed me what her son’s lunch looks like at the end of the day and it’s like a bento-box bomb went off. And while the idea of a litterless lunch is noble, the upfront expense of buying reusable containers only seems to pay for itself after the containers have been in use for a year—those lunch kits are expensive!

Read more: School bans eggs, dairy and nuts due to one student’s allergies>

Follow along as Jennifer Pinarski shares her experiences about giving up her big city job and lifestyle to live in rural Ontario with her husband, while staying home to raise their two young children. Read more Run-at-home mom posts or follow her @JenPinarski.

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